O Zhou et al, 2015. Coffee consumption and risk of endometrial cancer: a dose-response meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies, Scientific Reports, published online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT:

This is a dose-response (DR) meta-analysis to evaluate the association of coffee consumption on endometrial cancer (EC) risk. A total 1,534,039 participants from 13 published articles were added in this meta-analysis. The RR of total coffee consumption and EC were 0.80 (95% CI: 0.74-0.86). A stronger association between coffee intake and EC incidence was found in patients who were never treated with hormones, 0.60 (95% CI: 0.50-0.72), and subjects with a BMI ≥25 kg/m(2), 0.57 (95% CI: 0.46-0.71). The overall RRs for caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee were 0.66 (95% CI: 0.52-0.84) and 0.77 (95% CI: 0.63-0.94), respectively. A linear DR relationship was seen in coffee, caffeinated coffee, decaffeinated coffee and caffeine intake. The EC risk decreased by 5% for every 1 cup per day of coffee intake, 7% for every 1 cup per day of caffeinated coffee intake, 4% for every 1 cup per day of decaffeinated intake of coffee, and 4% for every 100 mg of caffeine intake per day. In conclusion, coffee and intake of caffeine might significantly reduce the incidence of EC, and these effects may be modified by BMI and history of hormone therapy.

The post O Zhou et al, 2015. Coffee consumption and risk of endometrial cancer: a dose-response meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies, Scientific Reports, published online ahead of print. appeared first on Coffee and Health.

V Notara et al, 2015, The role of coffee consumption on the 10-year (2004 – 2014) Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS) Incidence among cardiac patients: the GREECS observational study, International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition, published online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT:

The association between long-term coffee consumption and 10-year cardiovascular disease incidence among Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS) patients was evaluated. From 2003 to 2004, 2172 ACS consecutive patients from six major Greek hospitals were enrolled. During 2013-2014, the 10-year follow-up was performed (88% participation rate) and recurrent fatal or non-fatal ACS was recorded. Baseline coffee consumption (cups/day) was assessed using a semi-quantitative Food Frequency Questionnaire. Multi adjusted analysis revealed that 1-2 cups of coffee/day versus no consumption had an adverse effect on the ACS incidence [odds ratio (OR) = 1.35, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01, 1.79]. In subgroup analysis, with hypertension as strata, only the normotensive reached significance. Odds ratios for 1-2 and ≥3 cups relative to no consumption were [OR = 1.66, 95% CI 1.07, 2.60] and [OR = 1.86, 95% CI 1.06, 3.27], respectively, after controlling for potential confounders. Thus, avoidance of coffee may be of high importance to ameliorate disease prognosis among cardiac patients.

The post V Notara et al, 2015, The role of coffee consumption on the 10-year (2004 – 2014) Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS) Incidence among cardiac patients: the GREECS observational study, International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition, published online ahead of print. appeared first on Coffee and Health.

W Xu et al, 2015. Meta-analysis of modifiable risk factors for Alzheimer’s Disease, Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, published online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT

Background:  The aetiology of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is believed to involve environmental exposure and genetic susceptibility. The aim of our present systematic review and meta-analysis was to roundly evaluate the association between AD and its modifiable risk factors.

Methods:  We systematically searched PubMed and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews from inception to July 2014, and the references of retrieved relevant articles. We included prospective cohort studies and retrospective case–control studies.

Results:  16 906 articles were identified of which 323 with 93 factors met the inclusion criteria for meta-analysis. Among factors with relatively strong evidence (pooled population >5000) in our meta-analysis, we found grade I evidence for 4 medical exposures (oestrogen, statin, antihypertensive medications and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs therapy) as well as 4 dietary exposures (folate, vitamin E/C and coffee) as protective factors of AD. We found grade I evidence showing that one biochemical exposure (hyperhomocysteine) and one psychological condition (depression) significantly increase risk of developing AD. We also found grade I evidence indicative of complex roles of pre-existing disease (frailty, carotid atherosclerosis, hypertension, low diastolic blood pressure, type 2 diabetes mellitus (Asian population) increasing risk whereas history of arthritis, heart disease, metabolic syndrome and cancer decreasing risk) and lifestyle (low education, high body mass index (BMI) in mid-life and low BMI increasing the risk whereas cognitive activity, current smoking (Western population), light-to-moderate drinking, stress, high BMI in late-life decreasing the risk) in influencing AD risk. We identified no evidence suggestive of significant association with occupational exposures.

Conclusions:  Effective interventions in diet, medications, biochemical exposures, psychological condition, pre-existing disease and lifestyle may decrease new incidence of AD.

 

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B J Guercio et al, 2015, Coffee Intake, Recurrence, and Mortality in Stage III Colon Cancer: Results from CALGB 89803 (Alliance). Journal of Clinical Oncology, published online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Observational studies have demonstrated increased colon cancer recurrence in states of relative hyperinsulinemia, including sedentary lifestyle, obesity, and increased dietary glycemic load. Greater coffee consumption has been associated with decreased risk of type 2 diabetes and increased insulin sensitivity. The effect of coffee on colon cancer recurrence and survival is unknown.

Patients and Methods: During and 6 months after adjuvant chemotherapy, 953 patients with stage III colon cancer prospectively reported dietary intake of caffeinated coffee, decaffeinated coffee, and nonherbal tea, as well as 128 other items. We examined the influence of coffee, nonherbal tea, and caffeine on cancer recurrence and mortality using Cox proportional hazards regression.

Results: Patients consuming 4 cups/d or more of total coffee experienced an adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for colon cancer recurrence or mortality of 0.58 (95% CI, 0.34 to 0.99), compared with never drinkers (Ptrend = .002). Patients consuming 4 cups/d or more of caffeinated coffee experienced significantly reduced cancer recurrence or mortality risk compared with abstainers (HR, 0.48; 95% CI, 0.25 to 0.91; Ptrend = .002), and increasing caffeine intake also conferred a significant reduction in cancer recurrence or mortality (HR, 0.66 across extreme quintiles; 95% CI, 0.47 to 0.93;Ptrend = .006). Nonherbal tea and decaffeinated coffee were not associated with patient outcome. The association of total coffee intake with improved outcomes seemed consistent across other predictors of cancer recurrence and mortality.

Conclusion: Higher coffee intake may be associated with significantly reduced cancer recurrence and death in patients with stage III colon cancer.

The post B J Guercio et al, 2015, Coffee Intake, Recurrence, and Mortality in Stage III Colon Cancer: Results from CALGB 89803 (Alliance). Journal of Clinical Oncology, published online ahead of print. appeared first on Coffee and Health.