2014 Year in Review: Retail and Barista News

If anything, 2014 has proven that the North American retail market has opportunities for growth in all directions. As big chains plowed forward with obsessive retail expansions, North America was introduced to hundreds of small, independent shops with a genuine focus on service and craft. (We can count at least 20 exciting new coffee bars opened in Los Angeles alone in […]

It’s a Post-Xmas Supersonic Gathering in Berkeley with Tim Wendelboe

In 2011, Colombian coffee farmer and organizer Elias Roa met Oslo, Norway-based roaster and former World Barista Champion Tim Wendelboe with news that he’s just purchased 63 hectares of prime coffee land in the Huila Department. From that meeting sprung one of coffee’s most innovative and interesting collaborations on the farm now called Finca Tamana. Says Wendelboe: “I asked to rent […]

S Budhathoki et al, 2014. Coffee intake and risk of colorectal adenoma: the colorectal adenoma study in Tokyo, International Journal of Cancer, published online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT:

Coffee is a commonly consumed beverage which contains several potential anti carcinogenic and chemopreventive compounds, and has been hypothesized to have protective effects in colorectal neoplasia. However, the limited available data on coffee consumption in relation to colorectal adenoma (CRA), a precursor lesion to most colorectal cancers, remain largely inconsistent. In this study, we evaluated the association of coffee intake with the risk of CRA in a middle-aged Japanese population. Study subjects were selected from examinees who underwent total colonoscopy as part of a cancer screening program and responded to self-administered dietary and lifestyle questionnaires. A total of 738 patients with adenoma and 697 controls were included in the study. Coffee intake was assessed with a food frequency questionnaire, and divided into quartiles based on the distribution among controls. Unconditional logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) of CRA, with adjustment for potential confounding factors. High coffee consumption was associated with a reduced risk of CRA, with a multivariate-adjusted OR for the highest versus lowest quartile of coffee intake of 0.67 (95% CI=0.48-0.93; Ptrend =0.02). The inverse association of coffee intake was limited to proximal (OR=0.64; 95%CI= 0.44-0.95; Ptrend =0.04) and distal colon adenoma (OR=0.62; 95%CI=0.39-0.99; Ptrend =0.06), and appeared to be more evident with small (OR=0.68; 95%CI=0.49-0.96; Ptrend =0.04) and single adenomas (OR=0.65; 95%CI=0.44-0.95; Ptrend =0.02). Green tea intake was not found to be associated with CRA risk. This study provides support for the protective effect of coffee drinking on colon adenomas, a precursor of colon cancer.

The post S Budhathoki et al, 2014. Coffee intake and risk of colorectal adenoma: the colorectal adenoma study in Tokyo, International Journal of Cancer, published online ahead of print. appeared first on Coffee and Health.

C J Derry et al, 2014. Caffeine as an analgesic adjuvant for acute pain in adults, Cochrane Database Systematic Review, published online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT:

BACKGROUND: This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in Issue 3, 2012. Caffeine has been added to common analgesics such as paracetamol, ibuprofen, and aspirin, in the belief that it enhances analgesic efficacy. Evidence to support this belief is limited and often based on invalid comparisons.

OBJECTIVES: To assess the relative efficacy of a single dose of an analgesic plus caffeine against the same dose of the analgesic alone, without restriction on the analgesic used or the pain condition studied. We also assessed serious adverse events.

SEARCH METHODS: We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, and EMBASE from inception to 28 August 2014, the Oxford Pain Relief Database, and also carried out Internet searches and contacted pharmaceutical companies known to have carried out trials that have not been published.

SELECTION CRITERIA: We included randomised, double-blind studies that compared a single dose of analgesic plus caffeine with the same dose of the analgesic alone in the treatment of acute pain.

DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors independently assessed the eligibility and quality of studies, and extracted data. Any disagreements or uncertainties were settled by discussion with a third review author. We sought any validated measure of analgesic efficacy, but particularly the number of participants experiencing at least 50% of the maximum possible pain relief over four to six hours, participants reporting a global evaluation of treatment of very good or excellent, or headache relief after two hours. We pooled comparable data to look for a statistically significant difference, and calculated numbers needed to treat to benefit (NNT) with caffeine. We also looked for any numerical superiority associated with the addition of caffeine, and information about any serious adverse events.

MAIN RESULTS: We identified no new studies with available results for this update. The earlier review included 20 studies (7238 participants) in valid comparisons, but because we used different outcomes for some headache studies, the number of participants in the analyses of the effects of caffeine is now 4262 when previously it was 5243. The studies were generally of good methodological quality, using standard designs and mostly standard scales of pain measurement, although many of those treating postoperative pain were small. Most studies used paracetamol or ibuprofen, with 100 mg to 130 mg caffeine, and the most common pain conditions studied were postoperative dental pain, postpartum pain, and headache. There was a small but statistically significant benefit with caffeine used at doses of 100 mg or more, which was not dependent on the pain condition or type of analgesic. About 5% to 10% more participants achieve a good level of pain relief (at least 50% of the maximum over four to six hours) with the addition of caffeine, giving a NNT of about 14 (high quality evidence).Most comparisons individually demonstrated numerical superiority with caffeine, but not statistical superiority. One serious adverse event was reported with caffeine, but was considered unrelated to any study medication. We know of the existence of around 25 additional studies with almost 12,500 participants for which data for analysis were not obtainable. The additional analgesic effect of caffeine remained statistically significant but clinically less important even if all the known missing data had no effect; the bulk of the unobtainable data are reported to have similar results as this review.

AUTHORS’ CONCLUSIONS: The addition of caffeine (≥ 100 mg) to a standard dose of commonly used analgesics provides a small but important increase in the proportion of participants who experience a good level of pain relief.

The post C J Derry et al, 2014. Caffeine as an analgesic adjuvant for acute pain in adults, Cochrane Database Systematic Review, published online ahead of print. appeared first on Coffee and Health.

Mystery Solved: See Who Is Supplying Coffee to the White House

Earlier this year, Boston Globe reporter Matt Viser asserted that the coffee supplier for the White House had become something of a state secret. With little cooperation from the White House staff, Viser continued to pry, finding some evidence of supply relationships with a Hawaiian Kona coffee company, Starbucks and local roaster/retailer Swing’s Coffee. At a recent White House black-tie holiday dinner […]

R J Park & J D Moon, 2014. Coffee and depression in Korea: the fifth Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, published online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT:
Background/Objectives:
There is substantial interest in the health effects of coffee because it is the leading worldwide beverage after water. Existing literature on the connection between depression and coffee is scarce, and studies have yielded inconsistent results. The aim of this study was to examine the association between coffee consumption and depression in the Korean population.

Subjects/Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study in 10 177 Korean individuals aged 20-97 years who participated in the fifth Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Consumption of coffee and depression were assessed using a questionnaire. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to compute odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for depression.

Results: The lifetime prevalence of self-reported depression was 14.0% and that of self-reported clinical depression was 3.7%. After adjustment for potential confounders, the adjusted ORs for self-reported depression across coffee consumption categories were 1.00 (reference) for less than one cup/week, 0.84 (95% CI: 0.66, 1.07) for one to six cups/week, 0.63 (95% CI: 0.51, 0.79) for one cup/day, 0.69 (95% CI: 0.54, 0.88) for two cups/day and 0.58 (95% CI: 0.44, 0.76) for three or more cups/day (P for trend, <0.01). A similar association was observed for self-reported clinical depression, for which the multiple-adjusted ORs were 1.00 (reference) for less than one cup/week, 0.61 (95% CI: 0.40, 0.92) for one to six cups/week, 0.51 (95% CI: 0.34, 0.74) for one cup/day, 0.57 (95% CI: 0.39, 0.84) for two cups/day and 0.41 (95% CI: 0.24, 0.70) for three or more cups/day, respectively (P for trend, <0.01).

Conclusions: These findings support a possible protective effect of coffee on the risk of depression.

The post R J Park & J D Moon, 2014. Coffee and depression in Korea: the fifth Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, published online ahead of print. appeared first on Coffee and Health.

What Color Are Your Mugs? It Matters in Flavor Perception, Researchers Say

The color of coffee mugs has a substantial impact on the perception of flavor, according to a new study led by Australian researchers. Lead author of the study, published last week in the journal Flavour, George Vandoorn said he was inspired to pursue the research after a conversation at a coffee shop with a barista who told him that “when coffee is […]

M M Werler et al, 2014. Maternal cigarette, alcohol, and coffee consumption in relation to club foot. Paediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology, published online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT
BACKGROUND
: Clubfoot is associated with maternal cigarette smoking in several studies, but it is not clear if this association is confined to women who smoke throughout the at-risk period. Maternal alcohol and coffee drinking have not been well studied in relation to clubfoot.

METHODS: The present study used data from a population-based case-control study of clubfoot conducted in Massachusetts, New York, and North Carolina from 2007 to 2011. Mothers of 646 isolated clubfoot cases and 2037 controls were interviewed about pregnancy events and exposures, including the timing and frequency of cigarette smoking, alcohol intake, and coffee drinking.

RESULTS: More mothers of cases than controls reported smoking during early pregnancy (28.9% vs. 19.1%). Of women who smoked when they became pregnant, those who quit in the month after a first missed period had a 40% increase in clubfoot risk and those who continued to smoke during the next 3 months had more than a doubling in risk, after controlling for demographic factors, parity, obesity, and specific medication exposures. Adjusted odds ratios for women who drank >3 servings of alcohol or coffee per day throughout early pregnancy were 2.38 and 1.77, respectively, but the numbers of exposed women were small and odds ratios were unstable.

CONCLUSIONS: Clubfoot risk appears to be increased for offspring of women who smoke cigarettes, particularly those who continue smoking after pregnancy is recognisable, regardless of amount. For alcohol and coffee drinkers, suggested increased risks were only observed in higher levels of intake.

The post M M Werler et al, 2014. Maternal cigarette, alcohol, and coffee consumption in relation to club foot. Paediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology, published online ahead of print. appeared first on Coffee and Health.

Poursteady Uses Robotics Technology for a Commercial Pourover Bar

A group of New York-based engineers and product designers have turned a pet project for a commercial pourover machine and turned it into a full-blown business venture. The product is the Poursteady, a five-stand pourover bar that uses remote and robotics technology for what the inventors call precise and highly controllable single-cup pourovers. To our eyes, it’s the it seems like one […]

Planning for an Emergency Long-Term Survival Event? Don’t Forget Coffee!

Whichever hostile government takeover, zombie raid or other armageddon-type event you may be planning for, there’s a coffee for that. Salt Lake City, Utah-based My Patriot Supply — which specializes in short- and long-term survival items like water filtration systems, heirloom seeds, “Granny’s Homemade” dehydrated soup and “stove in a can” — has introduced Franklin’s Finest coffee. The company says the coffee, available […]