F Shang et al, 2015, Coffee consumption and risk of metabolic syndrome: a meta-analysis. Diabetes and Metabolism, published online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT:

Aims: The association between coffee consumption and risk of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) remains controversial. For this reason, a meta-analysis including dose–response analysis was conducted to quantitatively summarize the association between coffee intakes and MetS risk.
Methods: A search was made of PubMed and the China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) for relevant articles published between 1 January 1999 and 31 May 2015. All observational studies related to the relationship of coffee consumption and risk of MetS were included in the meta-analysis. The result was estimated by a random-effects model, while the dose–response relationship was assessed by a restricted cubic spline model.
Results: Eleven published reports including 13 studies with a total of 159,805 participants were eligible for our meta-analysis. The aggregated result (and 95% CI) for the highest vs lowest category of coffee consumption was 0.872 (0.781–0.975). After excluding one study with a relative risk (RR) < 0.300, the aggregated result (and 95% CI) was 0.889 (0.801–0.986). A non-linear relationship was found between coffee consumption and the MetS in the dose–response analysis.
Conclusion: This meta-analysis suggests that coffee consumption is associated with a low risk of MetS, and further studies to address the question of causality are now needed.

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F Turati et al, 2015, Coffee, Tea, Cola and Bladder Cancer Risk: Dose- and Time- relationships. Urology, Accepted Manuscript, published online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT:

OBJECTIVE: To further analyse the relation between coffee, tea and energy drinks and bladder cancer risk, considering dose, duration, and other time-related factors.

METHODS AND RESULTS: A multicentric case-control study on 690 bladder cancer cases and 665 hospital controls was conducted in Italy between 2003 and 2014. Odds ratios (OR) for bladder cancer were estimated using multiple logistic regression models. Compared with never coffee drinkers, sex, age, and tobacco-adjusted ORs were 1.28 (95% confidence interval, CI, 0.85-1.94) for current drinkers and 1.69 (95% CI 1.05-2.72) for lifetime drinkers of ≥4 cups/day. The corresponding ORs for an increment of one cup/day were 1.03 (95% CI 0.96-1.11) and 1.07 (95% CI 0.99-1.15), respectively. No association was found with duration or age at starting and no significant heterogeneity was found according to age and sex, although a slight increased risk emerged in never smokers. Decaffeinated coffee, tea, cola, and energy drinks were not related with bladder cancer risk.

CONCLUSIONS: Our study found no significant relation between coffee and bladder cancer risk after accounting for smoking, although the OR was above unity for high lifetime habit. The lack of dose and duration relationships, however, suggests the absence of a causal relation.

 

The post F Turati et al, 2015, Coffee, Tea, Cola and Bladder Cancer Risk: Dose- and Time- relationships. Urology, Accepted Manuscript, published online ahead of print. appeared first on Coffee and Health.

S B Zeng et al, 2015, Long-term coffee consumption and risk of gastric cancer, Medicine, Volume 94, Number 38.

ABSTRACT:

Association between coffee consumption and gastric cancer risk remains controversial. Hence, we performed a meta-analysis to investigate and quantify the potential dose-response association between long-term coffee consumption and risk of gastric cancer. Pertinent studies were identified by searching PubMed and Embase from January 1996 through February 10, 2015 and by reviewing the reference lists of retrieved publications. Prospective cohort studies in which authors reported effect sizes and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of gastric cancer for 3 or more categories of coffee consumption were eligible. Results from eligible studies were aggregated using a random effect model. All analyses were carried out using the STATA 12.0 software. Nine studies involving 15 independent prospective cohorts were finally included. A total of 2019 incident cases of gastric cancer were ascertained among 1,289,314 participants with mean follow-up periods ranging from 8 to 18 years. No nonlinear relationship of coffee consumption with gastric cancer risk was identified (P for nonlinearity = 0.53; P for heterogeneity = 0.004). The linear regression model showed that the combined relative risk (RR) of every 3 cups/day increment of total coffee consumption was 1.07 (95% CI = 0.95-1.21). Compared with the lowest category of coffee consumption, the RR of gastric cancer was 1.18 (95% CI = 0.90-1.55) for the highest (median 6.5 cups/day) category, 1.06 (95% CI = 0.85-1.32) for the second highest category (median 3.5 cups/day), and 0.97 (95% CI = 0.79-1.20) for the third highest category (median 1.5 cups/day). Subgroup analysis showed an elevated risk in the US population (RR = 1.36, 95% CI = 1.06-1.75) and no adjustment for smoking (RR = 1.67, 95% CI = 1.08-2.59) for 6.5 cups/day. Current evidence indicated there was no nonlinear association between coffee consumption and gastric cancer risk. However, high coffee consumption (more than 6.5 cups/day) might increase the risk of gastric cancer in the US population. More high quality studies were warranted to further investigate the association.

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