Y-P Zhang et al, 2015, Systematic review with meta-analysis: coffee consumption and the risk of gallstone disease, Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics, published online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT:
BACKGROUND: Epidemiologic evidence on coffee consumption reducing the risk of gallstone disease has been contradictory.

AIM: To perform a meta-analysis of observational studies, to investigate an association and dose-response of coffee consumption with gallstone disease.

METHODS: We used PubMed and EMBASE databases to identify all published studies before June 2015. A random-effects model was used to compute a pooled relative risk (RR) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs).

RESULTS: One case-control study and five prospective cohort studies (with seven cohorts) involving 227 749 participants and 11 477 gallstone disease cases were included. Coffee consumption was significantly associated with a reduced risk of gallstone disease (RR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.76 to 0.89; I2  = 35.9%), based on prospective studies; specifically, we observed an inverse relation in females, but not in males. The case-control study did not reveal any association between coffee and gallstone disease (OR, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.64 to 1.53). In a dose-response analysis, the RR of gallstone disease was 0.95 (95% CI, 0.91 to 1.00; P = 0.049) per 1 cup/day of coffee consumption. A significant nonlinear dose-response association was also identified (P for nonlinearity = 0.0106). For people who drank 2, 4 and 6 cups of coffee per day, the estimated RRs of gallstone disease were 0.89 (95% CI, 0.79 to 0.99), 0.81 (95% CI, 0.72 to 0.92) and 0.75 (95% CI, 0.64 to 0.88), respectively, compared with the lowest level drinkers.

CONCLUSION: This study suggests that coffee consumption is related to a significantly decreased risk of gallstone disease.

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The Duo Coffee Steeper: Immersion Brewing with a Twist

San Francisco startup Fellow Products is currently shipping its inaugural product, the Duo Coffee Steeper, to backers of its early-2014 Kickstarter campaign, with the wider product release scheduled for July. Offering a fresh take on the immersion brewing/passive filtration method of home coffee preparation that combines the steeping technique of a French Press with the gravity-filtered process of a manual […]

D S Liebeskind et al, 2015, The coffee paradox in stroke: increased consumption linked to fewer strokes. Nutritional Neuroscience published online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT:

Objective: To determine the association in amount of daily coffee consumption with incidence of stroke in a broad cohort, considering other vascular risk factors.

Methods: We utilized the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1988–1994; NHANES III) data on participants aged ≥17 years old to examine coffee consumption and stroke. Multivariate logistic regression models related the amount of coffee use reported in a food frequency questionnaire with stroke, controlling for other vascular risk factors.

Results: Of 33 994 NHANES III subjects, coffee consumption and stroke data in adults ≥17 years old were available in 19 994. Daily coffee consumption ranged from 0 to 20 (median 1) cups and 644 (3.2%) participants had a stroke diagnosed by a physician. Coffee intake varied with age, gender, and ethnicity (P < 0.001). Interestingly, heart failure, diabetes, and hypertension were less frequent, and high cholesterol more frequent in those consuming ≥3 cups per day (P < 0.001). Smoking was more frequent in all coffee drinkers (P < 0.0001). Multivariate analyses revealed an independent effect of heavier coffee consumption (≥3 cups/day) on reduced stroke (OR 0.44, 95% CI 0.22–0.87, P < 0.02) in healthy subjects that was attenuated by vascular risk factors (OR 0.78, 95% CI 0.58–1.07, P ≈ 0.12).

Conclusion: Heavier daily coffee consumption is associated with decreased stroke prevalence, despite smoking tendency in heavy coffee drinkers.

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Q&A on Colombian Institutional Reform with the FNC’s Luis Fernando Samper

by Michael Sheridan of CRS Coffeelands Blog In 2013, Colombia was roiled by a series of strikes that started in the coffeelands but soon went national.  The coffee growers who catalyzed the wave of protests called for immediate price supports and reforms to the country’s coffee institutions. President Juan Manuel Santos granted the former and, with respect to the latter, convened […]

L Orsi et al, 2015. Parental smoking, maternal alcohol, coffee and tea consumption during pregnancy, and childhood acute leukemia: the ESTELLE study. Cancer Causes and Control, published online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To investigate the role of parental smoking during pre-conception and pregnancy, maternal beverage consumption (alcohol, coffee and tea) during pregnancy and their possible interactions, in the etiology of childhood acute leukemia (CL).

METHODS: The ESTELLE study included 747 cases of CL [636 cases of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and 100 cases of acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML)] diagnosed in France in 2010-2011 and 1,421 population controls frequency-matched with the cases on age and gender. Data were obtained from structured telephone questionnaires administered to the mothers. The odds ratios (OR) and their 95 % confidence intervals were estimated using unconditional logistic regression models adjusted for potential confounders.

RESULTS: AML, but not ALL, was non-significantly associated with alcohol drinking during pregnancy [OR = 1.3 (0.8-2.0)] with a significant positive dose-response trend (p-trend = 0.02). Pre-conception paternal smoking was significantly associated with ALL [OR = 1.2 (1.1-1.5)] and AML [OR = 1.5 (1.0-2.3)]. CL was not associated with maternal smoking [OR = 1.0 (0.8-1.2)], or maternal coffee [OR = 0.9 (0.8-1.1)] or tea drinking [OR = 0.9 (0.8-1.1)] during pregnancy. However, a high consumption of coffee (>2 cups/day) was significantly associated with ALL [OR = 1.3 (1.0-1.8)].

CONCLUSIONS: The findings constitute additional evidence that maternal alcohol drinking during pregnancy may be involved in AML, and that paternal smoking before pregnancy may be a risk factor for CL. The role of maternal coffee drinking in CL remains unclear and should be investigated further in consortium analyses and in large birth cohort studies with exposure assessment more contemporaneous with the exposure, before the occurrence of the disease.

The post L Orsi et al, 2015. Parental smoking, maternal alcohol, coffee and tea consumption during pregnancy, and childhood acute leukemia: the ESTELLE study. Cancer Causes and Control, published online ahead of print. appeared first on Coffee and Health.

First Global Study on Climate Change and Arabica Predicts ‘Severe Losses’

Arabica coffees will have to be grown at higher elevations in almost all the world’s producing regions to survive the projected effects of climate change by 2050, according to a the first global study of its kind, which is being made public by the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT). Researchers suggest severe losses in global arabica production are imminent if coffee growing doesn’t […]

F Zimmermann-Viehoff et al, 2015. Short-term effects of espresso coffee on heart rate variability and blood pressure in habitual and non-habitual coffee consumers: a randomized crossover trial, Nutritional Neurosciences, published online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT

Objective: Coffee is one of the most widely consumed beverages worldwide. Aim of this study was to investigate short-term effects of espresso coffee on heart rate variability (HRV), a marker of vagal activity, in healthy habitual and non-habitual coffee consumers.
Methods: Seventy-seven healthy subjects (38 habitual and 39 non-habitual coffee consumers, 74% women, mean age 26.97 ± 6.88 years) took part in three laboratory sessions in a randomized order. In condition 1, subjects consumed espresso; in condition 2, subjects consumed decaffeinated espresso; and in condition 3, subjects consumed warm water. HRV and blood pressure were assessed at rest before and after ingestion of the respective beverage.
Results: HRV was significantly increased after consumption of caffeinated espresso, decaffeinated espresso, or water, indicating increased vagal activity in the course of the experiments. In the habitual coffee consumers, the increase in vagally mediated HRV was significantly lower after consumption of decaffeinated espresso compared to caffeinated espresso. Increases of systolic blood pressure were only found in the non-habitual consumers.
Conclusion: We found no evidence for specific short-term effects of caffeinated espresso on vagal activity in healthy subjects. Instead, consumption of decaffeinated espresso inhibited vagal activity in habitual consumers. This may be explained by an attempt of the organism to establish a sympathovagal equilibrium comparable to that after caffeine consumption. In the absence of caffeine-induced sympathetic activation, this may have been achieved by relative vagal withdrawal.

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Now Roasting in South Philadelphia’s Point Breeze: Other Animal

Diverging slightly from a career in restaurants and foodservice, Daniel Westiner has created his own small-batch commercial roasting operation, Other Animal Coffee Roasters, in South Philadelphia’s Point Breeze neighborhood. The roastery concept has been developing in Westiner’s mind for a period of years, forming in earnest after Westiner managed the opening of Talula’s Daily, an upscale, food-focused cafe concept spun off from the farm-to-table […]

K A Hahn et al, 2015. Caffeine and Caffeinated Beverage Consumption and Risk of Spontaneous Abortion, Human Reproduction, published online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT:

STUDY QUESTION: Is caffeine and caffeinated beverage consumption associated with the risk of spontaneous abortion (SAB)?

SUMMARY ANSWER: While preconceptional caffeine consumption was not materially associated with an increased risk of SAB, consumption during early pregnancy was associated with a small increased risk of SAB, although the relation was not linear.

WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY: Caffeine has been hypothesized as a risk factor for SAB since the 1980s; however, results from previous studies have been conflicting.

STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION: This prospective cohort study included 5132 Danish women planning pregnancy and enrolled from 2007 to 2010.

PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS: Participants were women who conceived after entry into the Snart-Gravid cohort and who were aged 18-40, in a stable relationship with a male partner, and did not use fertility treatments to conceive. Women reported their daily caffeine and caffeinated beverage consumption on questionnaires before conception and during early pregnancy. All exposure measurements were prospective with respect to outcome ascertainment. We estimated hazard ratios (HRs) of SAB for categories of caffeine consumption in milligrams (mg) per day and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using Cox proportional hazards regression models with gestational weeks as the time scale.

MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE: There were 732 women (14.3%) who were identified as having a SAB. In the preconceptional period, caffeine consumption was not materially associated with SAB risk (HR comparing ≥300 with <100 mg/day: 1.09; 95% CI: 0.89, 1.33). In early pregnancy, the HRs for 100-199, 200-299 and ≥300 mg/day of caffeine consumption were 1.62 (95% CI: 1.19, 2.22), 1.48 (95% CI: 1.03, 2.13) and 1.23 (95% CI: 0.61, 2.46), respectively, compared with that for <100 mg/day.

LIMITATIONS, REASONS FOR CAUTION: The observed results may be affected by non-differential exposure misclassification, reverse causation and residual confounding.

WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGS: This is the largest study to date of prospectively measured, preconception caffeine consumption and risk of SAB. We were able to reduce the likelihood of differential left truncation bias and recall bias present in other analyses.

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