L Li et al, 2015. Coffee consumption and the risk of gastric cancer: a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies, BMC Cancer, published online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT:

Background: Several observational studies suggest that coffee consumption may be associated with an increased risk of gastric cancer, but the results are inconsistent. We conducted a meta-analysis to evaluate the relationship of coffee consumption with gastric cancer risk and quantify the dose–response relationship between them

Methods: Relevant prospective studies were identified by a search of PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science to May 2015 and by reviewing the references of retrieved articles. Two independent reviewers extracted data and performed the quality assessment. A random-effects model was used to calculate the pooled risk estimates and 95 % confidence intervals (CI). The heterogeneity was assessed using the I (2) statistic. Publication bias was assessed by using funnel plot, the Begg test and the Egger test.

Results: Thirteen prospective cohort studies with 20 independent reports involving 3,368 patients with gastric cancer and 1,372,811 participants during a follow-up period ranging from 4.3–8 years were included. Compared with the lowest consumption level of coffee, the pooled relative risk (RR) was 1.13 (95 % CI: 0.94–1.35). The dose–response analysis indicated that, the RR of gastric cancer was 1.03 (95 % CI; 0.95–1.11) for per 3 cups/day of coffee consumption. Any nonlinear association of gastric cancer risk with coffee consumption was not found (P for nonlinearity = 0.68). Subgroup analyses indicated that the pooled RR for participants from the United States comparing the highest with the lowest coffee consumption was 1.36 (95 % CI, 1.06–1.75, I(2) = 0 %). In addition, people with higher coffee consumption was associated with 25 % higher risk of gastric cancer in equal to or less than 10 years follow-up group (RR = 1.25; 95 % CI, 1.01–1.55, I (2) = 0 %). Visual inspection of a funnel plot and the Begg’s and the Egger’s tests did not indicate evidence of publication bias.

Conclusions: This meta-analysis does not support the hypothesis that coffee consumption is associated with the risk of gastric cancer. The increased risk of gastric cancer for participants from the United States and equal to or less than 10 years follow-up group associated with coffee consumption warrant further studies.

The post L Li et al, 2015. Coffee consumption and the risk of gastric cancer: a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies, BMC Cancer, published online ahead of print. appeared first on Coffee and Health.

P Zuchinali et al, 2015, Effect of Caffeine on Ventricular Arrhythmia: A Systematic review and Meta-Analysis of Experimental and Clinical Studies, Europace, published online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT:

AIMS: The relationship between caffeine consumption and the occurrence of arrhythmias remains controversial. Despite this lack of scientific evidence, counselling to reduce caffeine consumption is still widely advised in clinical practice. We conducted a systematical review and meta-analysis of interventional studies of the caffeine effects on ventricular arrhythmias.

METHODS AND RESULTS: The search was performed on Pubmed, Embase, and Cochrane database, and terms related to coffee, caffeine, and cardiac arrhythmias were used. Methodological quality was assessed based on The Cochrane Collaboration recommendations and the ARRIVE guidelines. There were 2016 citations retrieved on the initial research. After full-text assessment, seven human and two animal studies were included in the meta-analysis. In animal studies, the main outcome reported was the ventricular fibrillation threshold. We observed a significant mean difference of -2.15 mA (95% CI -3.43 to -0.87; I2 0.0%, P for heterogeneity = 0.37). The main outcome evaluated in human studies was the rate of ventricular premature beats (VPBs). The overall relative risk for occurrence of VPBs in 24 h attributed to caffeine exposure was 1.00 (95% CI 0.94-1.06; I2 13.5%, P for heterogeneity = 0.32). Sensitivity analysis for caffeine dose, different designs, and subject profile was performed and no major differences were observed.

CONCLUSION: Our meta-analysis demonstrates that data from human interventional studies do not show a significant effect of caffeine consumption on the occurrence of VBPs. The effects observed in animal studies are most probably the result of very high caffeine doses that are not regularly consumed in a daily basis by humans.

The post P Zuchinali et al, 2015, Effect of Caffeine on Ventricular Arrhythmia: A Systematic review and Meta-Analysis of Experimental and Clinical Studies, Europace, published online ahead of print. appeared first on Coffee and Health.

A J Gaskin et al, 2015. Pre-pregnancy nutrition and early pregnancy outcome, Current Nutrition Reports, Volume 4.

ABSTRACT:

Implantation failure and pregnancy loss are estimated to affect up to 75% of fertilized ova; however as of yet there is limited empirical evidence, particularly at the population level, for understanding the environmental determinants of these losses. The purpose of this review is to summarize the current knowledge on pre-pregnancy nutrition and early pregnancy outcomes with particular focus on the outcome of spontaneous abortion among pregnancies conceived naturally and early pregnancy end points among pregnancies conceived through in vitro fertilization. To date, there is limited evidence to support associations of pre-pregnancy vitamin D and caffeine intake with pregnancy loss. There is suggestive data supporting a link between a healthy diet and lower risk of pregnancy loss. High folate and minimal to no alcohol intake prior to conception have the most consistent evidence supporting an association with lower risk of pregnancy loss.

The post A J Gaskin et al, 2015. Pre-pregnancy nutrition and early pregnancy outcome, Current Nutrition Reports, Volume 4. appeared first on Coffee and Health.

V Gupta et al, 2015. Oily fish, Coffee and Walnuts: Dietary Treatment for non-alcoholic fatty iver disease, World Journal of Gastroenterology, Volume 21 (37)

ABSTRACT

Rates of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are increasing worldwide in tandem with the metabolic syndrome, with the progressive form of disease, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) likely to become the most common cause of end stage liver disease in the not too distant future. Lifestyle modification and weight loss remain the main focus of management in NAFLD and NASH, however, there has been growing interest in the benefit of specific foods and dietary components on disease progression, with some foods showing protective properties. This article provides an overview of the foods that show the most promise and their potential benefits in NAFLD/NASH, specifically; oily fish/ fish oil, coffee, nuts, tea, red wine, avocado and olive oil. Furthermore, it summarises results from animal and human trials and highlights potential areas for future research.

The post V Gupta et al, 2015. Oily fish, Coffee and Walnuts: Dietary Treatment for non-alcoholic fatty iver disease, World Journal of Gastroenterology, Volume 21 (37) appeared first on Coffee and Health.