K Sugiyama et al, 2015. Association Between Coffee Consumption and Incident Risk of Disabling Dementia in Elderly Japanese: the Oshaki Cohort 2006 study, Journal of Alzheimers Disease, published online ahead of print.

Abstract

Epidemiological studies of the association between coffee consumption and dementia have yielded inconsistent results. Therefore, we investigated the association between coffee consumption and incident risk of dementia in an elderly Japanese population. 23,091 subjects aged ≥65 y living in Ohsaki City, northeastern Japan, responded to the baseline survey in 2006. Of these, we analyzed 13,137 subjects who gave informed consent and were not disabled at baseline. The outcome was the incidence of disabling dementia defined by usage of the Long-term Care Insurance database. We used the Cox proportional hazards regression model for multivariate analysis. During 5.7 y of follow-up period, we identified 1,107 cases of incident dementia. Overall, coffee consumption was significantly associated with a lower risk of incident dementia. The multivariate-adjusted HRs for the incidence of dementia according to coffee consumption categories (never, occasionally, 1-2 cups/d, and ≥3 cups/d) were 1.00, 0.73 (95% CI, 0.62–0.86), 0.72 (95% CI, 0.61–0.84), and 0.82 (95% CI, 0.65–1.02; p for trend = 0.009), respectively. In addition, this significant inverse association was more remarkable among women, non-smokers, and non-drinkers. Coffee consumption is significantly associated with a lower risk of incident dementia.

The post K Sugiyama et al, 2015. Association Between Coffee Consumption and Incident Risk of Disabling Dementia in Elderly Japanese: the Oshaki Cohort 2006 study, Journal of Alzheimers Disease, published online ahead of print. appeared first on Coffee and Health.

K C Sajja et al, 2015. Coffee or Tea, Hot or Cold, are Not Associated with risk of Barret’s Esophagus, Clinical Gastroenterology & Hepatology, published online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT:

Epidemiological data regarding coffee and tea consumption and risk of esophageal inflammation, Barrett’s esophagus (BE), and adenocarcinoma are sparse and inconclusive. This study examined the association between consumption of tea or coffee with risk of BE. We conducted a cross-sectional study among United States veterans, comparing 310 patients with histologically confirmed BE with 1728 individuals with no endoscopic or histopathologic features of BE (controls). Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using logistic regression models. In univariate models, we found a statistically significant association between risk of BE and consumption of coffee (OR, 1.41; 95% CI, 1.06-1.87) or tea (OR, 1.34; 95% CI, 1.05-1.71). However, in multivariate analysis, in which models were adjusted for confounders including sex and race, we found no association between risk of BE and consumption of coffee (adjusted OR, 1.04; 95% CI, 0.76-1.42) or tea (adjusted OR, 1.11; 95% CI, 0.85-1.44). These data do not support an association between consumption of coffee or tea and risk of BE. It is unlikely that avoidance of coffee or tea will protect against BE.

The post K C Sajja et al, 2015. Coffee or Tea, Hot or Cold, are Not Associated with risk of Barret’s Esophagus, Clinical Gastroenterology & Hepatology, published online ahead of print. appeared first on Coffee and Health.

A Nehlig, 2015. Effects of coffee/caffeine on brain health and disease: what should I tell my patients? Practical Neurology, published online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT

Over the last decade, Food Regulation Authorities have concluded that coffee/caffeine consumption is not harmful if consumed at levels of 200 mg in one sitting (around 2½ cups of coffee) or 400 mg daily (around 5 cups of coffee). In addition, caffeine has many positive actions on the brain. It can increase alertness and well-being, help concentration, improve mood and limit depression. Caffeine may disturb sleep, but only in sensitive individuals. It may raise anxiety in a small subset of particularly sensitive people. Caffeine does not seem to lead to dependence, although a minority of people experience withdrawal symptoms. Caffeine can potentiate the effect of regular analgesic drugs in headache and migraine. Lifelong coffee/caffeine consumption has been associated with prevention of cognitive decline, and reduced risk of developing stroke, Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease. Its consumption does not seem to influence seizure occurrence. Thus, daily coffee and caffeine intake can be part of a healthy balanced diet; its consumption does not need to be stopped in elderly people.

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J J Rhee et al, 2015, Coffee and Caffeine Consumption and the Risk of Hypertension in Postmenopausal Women, American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, published online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT:

BACKGROUND: The associations of coffee and caffeine intakes with the risk of incident hypertension remain controversial.

OBJECTIVE: We sought to assess longitudinal relations of caffeinated coffee, decaffeinated coffee, and total caffeine intakes with mean blood pressure and incident hypertension in postmenopausal women in the Women’s Health Initiative Observational Study.

DESIGN: In a large prospective study, type and amount of coffee and total caffeine intakes were assessed by using self-reported questionnaires. Hypertension status was ascertained by using measured blood pressure and self-reported drug-treated hypertension. The mean intakes of caffeinated coffee, decaffeinated coffee, and caffeine were 2-3 cups/d, 1 cup/d, and 196 mg/d, respectively. Using multivariable linear regression, we examined the associations of baseline intakes of caffeinated coffee, decaffeinated coffee, and caffeine with measured systolic and diastolic blood pressures at annual visit 3 in 29,985 postmenopausal women who were not hypertensive at baseline. We used Cox proportional hazards models to estimate HRs and their 95% CIs for time to incident hypertension.

RESULTS: During 112,935 person-years of follow-up, 5566 cases of incident hypertension were reported. Neither caffeinated coffee nor caffeine intake was associated with mean systolic or diastolic blood pressure, but decaffeinated coffee intake was associated with a small but clinically irrelevant decrease in mean diastolic blood pressure. Decaffeinated coffee intake was not associated with mean systolic blood pressure. Intakes of caffeinated coffee, decaffeinated coffee, and caffeine were not associated with the risk of incident hypertension (P-trend > 0.05 for all).

CONCLUSION: In summary, these findings suggest that caffeinated coffee, decaffeinated coffee, and caffeine are not risk factors for hypertension in postmenopausal women.

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