M Ding et al, 2015. Association of Coffee Consumption with Total and Cause-Specific Mortality in Three Large Prospective Cohorts, Circulation, published online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT:

Background: The association between consumption of caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee and risk of mortality remains inconclusive.

Methods and Results: We examined the associations of consumption of total, caffeinated, and decaffeinated coffee with risk of subsequent total and cause-specific mortality among 74,890 women in the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS), 93,054 women in the NHS 2, and 40,557 men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. Coffee consumption was assessed at baseline using a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. During 4,690,072 person-years of follow-up, 19,524 women and 12,432 men died. Consumption of total, caffeinated, and decaffeinated coffee were non-linearly associated with mortality. Compared to non-drinkers, coffee consumption one to five cups/d was associated with lower risk of mortality, while coffee consumption more than five cups/d was not associated with risk of mortality. However, when restricting to never smokers, compared to non-drinkers, the HRs of mortality were 0.94 (0.89 to 0.99) for  1 cup/d, 0.92 (0.87 to 0.97) for 1.1-3 cups/d, 0.85 (0.79 to 0.92) for 3.1-5 cups/d, and 0.88 (0.78 to 0.99) for > 5 cups/d (p for non-linearity = 0.32; p for trend < 0.001). Significant inverse associations were observed for caffeinated (p for trend < 0.001) and decaffeinated coffee (p for trend = 0.022). Significant inverse associations were observed between coffee consumption and deaths due to cardiovascular disease, neurological diseases, and suicide. No significant association between coffee consumption and total cancer mortality was found.

Conclusions: Higher consumption of total coffee, caffeinated coffee, and decaffeinated coffee was associated with lower risk of total mortality.

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F Liu et al, 2015. Coffee Consumption Decreases Risks for Hepatic Fibrosis and Cirrhosis: A Meta-Analysis, PLOS One, published online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT:

BACKGROUND AND AIM: Previous studies have demonstrated that coffee consumption may be inversely correlated with hepatic fibrosis and cirrhosis. However, the reported results have been inconsistent. To summarize previous evidences quantitatively, a meta-analysis was performed.

METHODS: The Medline, Web of Science, and Embase databases (from inception to June 2015) were searched to identify relevant trials that evaluated the effects of coffee consumption on hepatic fibrosis or cirrhosis. Odds ratios (ORs) of advanced hepatic fibrosis or cirrhosis for low or moderate, high, and any coffee consumption versus no consumption were pooled. Two cups per day was used as the cut-off level between low or moderate and high consumption.

RESULTS: Sixteen studies were included, involving 3034 coffee consumers and 132076 people who do not consume coffee. The pooled results of the meta-analysis indicated that coffee consumers were less likely to develop cirrhosis compared with those who do not consume coffee, with a summary OR of 0.61 (95%CI: 0.45-0.84). For low or moderate coffee consumption versus no consumption, the pooled OR of hepatic cirrhosis was 0.66 (95%CI: 0.47-0.92). High coffee consumption could also significantly reduce the risk for hepatic cirrhosis when compared with no coffee consumption (OR = 0.53, 95%CI: 0.42-0.68). The effect of coffee consumption on hepatic fibrosis was summarized as well. The pooled OR of advanced hepatic fibrosis for coffee consumption versus no consumption was 0.73 (95%CI: 0.58-0.92). The protective effect of coffee on hepatic fibrosis and cirrhosis was also identified in subgroup meta-analyses of patients with alcoholic liver disease and chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection.

CONCLUSION: Coffee consumption can significantly reduce the risk for hepatic fibrosis and cirrhosis.

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M Shinoda et al, 2015. Inverse Relationship between Coffee Consumption and Cerebral Microbleeds in Men, but Not Women, Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases, Volume 24 (10)

ABSTRACT:

Background: Studies evaluating the association between coffee consumption and neurovascular diseases have frequently yielded contradictory results. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of coffee consumption with smallvessel disease (SVD) incidence in a healthy urban population while accounting for multiple demographic and lifestyle risk factors.
Methods: This prospective study conducted from May 2013 through March 2014 included 455 participants (314 men and 141 women) aged 25 to 92 years. All subjects completed a questionnaire on coffee consumption and received a comprehensive neurologic examination, including magnetic resonance imaging, at St. Luke’s International Hospital (Tokyo, Japan).
Results: Incidence of SVD was lower in male daily coffee drinkers than male nondrinkers and occasional drinkers, whereas incidence of white matter lesions was lower in female daily coffee drinkers than female nondrinkers or occasional drinkers. In multivariate analyses including age, sex, smoking status, and BMI, as well as coffee consumption, incidence of microbleeds was significantly lower in male daily coffee drinkers compared to nondrinkers.
Conclusions: Daily coffee consumption is associated with reduced risk of cerebral microbleeds in men.

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G Grosso et al, 2015, Coffee, tea, caffeine and risk of depression: a systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis of observational studies, Mol Nutr Food Res, published online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT:

SCOPE: The aim of the study was to systematically review and analyze results from observational studies on coffee, caffeine, and tea consumption and association or risk of depression.

METHODS AND RESULTS: Embase and Pubmed databases were searched from inception to June 2015 for observational studies reporting the odds ratios (ORs) or relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of depression by coffee/tea/caffeine consumption. Random-effects models, subgroup and dose-response analyses were performed. Twelve studies with 23 datasets were included in the meta-analysis, accounting for a total of 346,913 individuals and 8146 cases of depression. Compared to individuals with lower coffee consumption, those with higher intakes had pooled RR of depression of 0.76 (95% CI: 0.64, 0.91). Dose-response effect suggests a non-linear J-shaped relation between coffee consumption and risk of depression with a peak of protective effect for 400 ml/d. A borderline non-significant association between tea consumption and risk of depression was found (RR 0.70, 95% CI: 0.48, 1.01) while significant results were found only for analysis of prospective studies regarding caffeine consumption (RR = 0.84, 95% CI: 0.75, 0.93).

CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests a protective effect of coffee and, partially, of tea and caffeine on risk of depression.

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