W E Ek et al, 2017. Tea and coffee consumption in relation to DNA methylation in four European cohorts, Human Molecular Genetics, published online.

Abstract

Lifestyle factors, such as food choices and exposure to chemicals, can alter DNA methylation and lead to changes in gene activity. Two such exposures with pharmacologically active components are coffee and tea consumption. Both coffee and tea has been suggested to play an important role in modulating disease-risk in humans by suppressing tumour progression, decreasing inflammation and influencing estrogen metabolism. These mechanisms may be mediated by changes in DNA methylation.To investigate if DNA methylation in blood is associated with coffee and tea consumption we performed a genome-wide DNA methylation study for coffee and tea consumption in four European cohorts (N = 3,096). DNA methylation was measured from whole blood at 421,695 CpG sites distributed throughout the genome and analysed in men and women both separately and together in each cohort. Meta-analyses of the results and additional regional-level analyses were performed.After adjusting for multiple testing, the meta-analysis revealed that two individual CpG-sites, mapping to DNAJC16 and TTC17, were differentially methylated in relation to tea consumption in women. No individual sites were associated in men or in the sex-combined analysis for tea or coffee. The regional analysis revealed that 28 regions were differentially methylated in relation to tea consumption in women. These regions contained genes known to interact with estradiol metabolism and cancer. No significant regions were found in the sex-combined and male-only analysis for either tea or coffee consumption.

The post W E Ek et al, 2017. Tea and coffee consumption in relation to DNA methylation in four European cohorts, Human Molecular Genetics, published online. appeared first on Coffee and Health.

K Goempel et al, 2017. Biomarker monitoring of controlled dietary acrylamide exposure indicates consistent human endogenous background, Archives of Toxicology, published online.


Abstract

The aim of the present study was to explore the relation of controlled dietary acrylamide (AA) intake with the excretion of AA-related urinary mercapturic acids (MA), N-acetyl-S-(carbamoylethyl)-L-cysteine (AAMA) and N-acetyl-S-(1-carbamoyl-2-hydroxyethyl)-L-cysteine (GAMA). Excretion kinetics of these short-term exposure biomarkers were monitored under strictly controlled conditions within a duplicate diet human intervention study. One study arm (group A, n = 6) ingested AA via coffee (0.15-0.17 µg/kg bw) on day 6 and in a meal containing an upper exposure level of AA (14.1-15.9 μg/kg bw) on day 10. The other arm (group B) was on AA minimized diet (washout, 0.05-0.06 µg/kg bw) throughout the whole 13-day study period. On day 6, these volunteers ingested 13C3D3-AA (1 μg/kg bw). In both arms, urinary MA excretion was continuously monitored and blood samples were taken to determine hemoglobin adducts. Ingestion of four cups of coffee resulted in a slightly enhanced short-term biomarker response within the background range of group B. At the end of the 13-day washout period, group B excreted an AAMA baseline level of 0.14 ± 0.10 µmol/d although AA intake was only about 0.06 µmol/d. This sustained over-proportional AAMA background suggested an endogenous AA baseline exposure level of 0.3-0.4 µg/kg bw/d. The excretion of 13C3D3-AA was practically complete within 72-96 h which rules out delayed release of AA (or any other MA precursor) from deep body compartments. The results provide compelling support for the hypothesis of a sustained endogenous AA formation in the human body.

The post K Goempel et al, 2017. Biomarker monitoring of controlled dietary acrylamide exposure indicates consistent human endogenous background, Archives of Toxicology, published online. appeared first on Coffee and Health.

I Sanchez-Sellero et al, 2017. Caffeine Intake and Meniere’s Disease: Is there relationship? Nutritional Neuroscince, published online.

 

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Although it is commonly recognized that dietary restrictions may improve the clinical course of Menière’s disease, their effectiveness has not been definitely demonstrated. The aim of this study was to examine whether caffeine consumption could be involved in Menière’s disease.

METHODS: Cross-sectional, observational, case-control study, comparing caffeine consumption (intake of coffee, tea, kola-type beverages, energy drinks, and chocolate-containing beverages or foods) between patients with Menière’s disease (group A) and patients affected by vertigo with other origins (group B) and/or control subjects (group C).

PATIENTS: 180 subjects (72 in group A, 72 in group B, and 36 in group C). Caffeine intake was categorized in four levels: very low (0-25 mg/day), low (26-100 mg/day), moderate (101-300 mg/day), and high (≥301 mg/day). Very low and low intake were considered light consumption, and moderate and high intake, heavy consumption.

RESULTS: Mean daily caffeine intake was 175.8 mg. Menière’s disease patients showed a daily caffeine intake (222 mg) greater than those not affected by this disease (145 mg). Excluding in group B migraine patients, differences in caffeine intake are significant among the three groups (P = 0.021). There were significantly more heavy-consumers in group A than in other two groups jointed (P = 0.024; OR = 1.301, IC95% (1.015;1.668)). In group A, the age at onset of symptoms in caffeine consumers (49.7 years) was lower than in non-consumers (55.9 years).

DISCUSSION: It should be recommended to reduce caffeine intake in those population groups with higher risk of Menière’s disease (e.g. subjects with family members suffering from this disease).

The post I Sanchez-Sellero et al, 2017. Caffeine Intake and Meniere’s Disease: Is there relationship? Nutritional Neuroscince, published online. appeared first on Coffee and Health.

T van der Hoeven et al, 2017. Antenatal coffee and tea consumption and the effect on birth outcome and hypertensive pregnancy disorders. PLoS One, published online.

 

Abstract

Background and objective

Coffee and tea are commonly consumed during pregnancy. While several of their components, like caffeine, have strong pharmacological effects, the effect on the unborn fetus remains unclear. Caffeine intake has been associated with abortion, preterm birth and fetal growth restriction, but a general consensus on caffeine restriction is still lacking. We aimed to investigate antenatal coffee, tea and caffeine consumption and the effect on birth weight and length, gestational age at birth and hypertensive disorders in pregnancy.

Methods

A total of 936 healthy pregnancies from the WHISTLER birth cohort with data on coffee and tea consumption were included. Maternal and child characteristics as well as antenatal coffee and tea consumption were obtained through postpartum questionnaires. Reported consumption was validated using available preconceptional data. Caffeine intake was calculated from coffee and tea consumption. Linear and logistic regression was used to assess the association with birth outcome and hypertensive disorders.

Results

After adjustment for smoking and maternal age, a daily consumption of more than 300mg of caffeine compared to less than 100mg of caffeine was significantly associated with an increased gestational age (linear regression coefficient = 2.00 days, 95%CI = 0.12–4.21, P = 0.03). Tea consumption was significantly related to a higher risk of pregnancy induced hypertension (OR = 1.13, 95%CI = 1.04–1.23, P = 0.004). No associations concerning coffee consumption or birth weight and birth length were observed.

Conclusions

Daily caffeine consumption of more than 300mg is possibly associated with an increase in gestational age at birth. A possible relation between high tea consumption and increased risk for pregnancy induced hypertension warrants further research. For most outcomes, we found no significant associations with coffee or tea intake.

The post T van der Hoeven et al, 2017. Antenatal coffee and tea consumption and the effect on birth outcome and hypertensive pregnancy disorders. PLoS One, published online. appeared first on Coffee and Health.

R Wierzejska, 2017. Can coffee consumption lower the risk of Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease? A literature review, Archives of Medical Science, Volume 13 (3)


ABSTRACT:

In light of the fact that the number of elderly citizens in society is steadily increasing, the search for dietary factors which might prolong mental agility is growing in significance. Coffee, together with its main ingredient, caffeine, has been the focus of much attention from various researchers, as data on its beneficial effects on human health continue to accumulate. Most reports indicate that moderate coffee consumption may in fact lower the risk for common neurodegenerative conditions, i.e. Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. Regardless, due to their complex pathogenesis as well as methodology of scientific research, the exact impact of coffee consumption remains to be fully elucidated. At present, it seems safe to inform the general public that coffee drinkers need not fear for their health. Possibly, in the future experts will recommend drinking coffee not only to satisfy individual taste preferences but also to decrease age-related mental deterioration.

The post R Wierzejska, 2017. Can coffee consumption lower the risk of Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease? A literature review, Archives of Medical Science, Volume 13 (3) appeared first on Coffee and Health.