J Xia et al, 2017. An Up to Date Meta-Analysis of Coffee Consumption and Risk of Prostate Cancer, Urology Journal, Volume 14 (5).

ABSTRACT:

PURPOSE: Results of the association between coffee consumption (CC) and the risk of prostate cancer (PC) are still controversy. Based on published relevant studies, we conducted an up-to-date meta-analysis to investigate this issue.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: The protocol used in this article is in accordance with the PRISMA checklist. Eligible studies were screened and retrieved by using PUBMED and EMBASE as well as manual review of references up to July 2016. We calculated the pooled relative risk (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) with random effect models. The dose-response relationship was assessed by generalized least-squares trend estimation analysis.

RESULTS: Totally, we included twenty-eight studies (14 case-control and 14 cohort studies) on CC with 42399 PC patients for the final meta-analysis. No significant association of PC was found for high versus non/lowestCC, with RR = 1.07 (95% CI: 0.96-1.18). In subgroup meta-analysis by study design, there were no significant positive associations between CC and PC in case-control studies (RR = 1.19, 95% CI: 1.05-1.35) or in the cohort studies (RR = 0.97, 95% CI: 0.84-1.12). Additionally, RR with different quality of studies were respectively 1.15 (95% CI: 0.99-1.34) and 1.28 (95% CI: 1.03-1.58) for high and low quality in the case-control studies; while were respectively 1.02 (95% CI: 0.88-1.20) and 0.81 (95% CI: 0.57-1.14) in the cohort studies. When analyzed by geographic area, we found no association between CC and PC, with RR = 1.06 (95% CI: 0.86-1.30) for 10 studies from Europe, 1.06 (95% CI: 0.94-1.20) for 13 studies conducted in America; 1.12 (95% CI: 0.70-1.79) for 4 studies from Asia. However, in subgroup analysis by subtype of the disease, there was a significant negative (beneficial) association in the localized PC (RR = 0.90, 95% CI: 0.84-0.97), but not for the advanced PC (RR = 0.90, 95%CI: 0.70-1.16). Additionally, RR = 0.99 (95% CI: 0.98-0.99) for an increment of one cup per day of coffee intake shows significant association with the localized PC.

CONCLUSION: Our results indicate that CC has no harmful effect on PC. On the contrary, it has an effect on reducing the localized PC risk. Further prospective cohort studies of high quality are required to clarify this relationship.

 

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G Grosso et al, 2017. Coffee, Caffeine, and Health Outcomes: An Umbrella Review, Annual Reviews Nutrition, Volume 37.

ABSTRACT:

To evaluate the associations between coffee and caffeine consumption and various health outcomes, we performed an umbrella review of the evidence from meta-analyses of observational studies and randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Of the 59 unique outcomes examined in the selected 112 meta analyses of observational studies, coffee was associated with a probable decreased risk of breast, colorectal, colon, endometrial, and prostate cancers; cardiovascular disease and mortality; Parkinson’s disease; and type-2 diabetes. Of the 14 unique outcomes examined in the 20 selected meta-analyses of observational studies, caffeine was associated with a probable decreased risk of Parkinson’s disease and type-2 diabetes and an increased risk of pregnancy loss. Of the 12 unique acute outcomes examined in the selected 9 meta analyses of RCTs, coffee was associated with a rise in serum lipids, but this result was affected by significant heterogeneity, and caffeine was associated with a rise in blood pressure. Given the spectrum of conditions studied and the robustness of many of the results, these findings indicate that coffee can be part of a healthful diet.

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G Grosso et al, 2017. Long-Term Coffee Consumption Is Associated with Decreased Incidence of New-Onset Hypertension: A Dose-Response Meta-Analysis, Nutrients, Volume 17, published online.

ABSTRACT:

Objective:
To perform a dose–response meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies investigating the association between long-term coffee intake and risk of hypertension.

Methods:
An online systematic search of studies published up to November 2016 was performed. Linear and non-linear dose–response meta-analyses were conducted; potential evidence of heterogeneity, publication bias, and confounding effect of selected variables were investigated through sensitivity and meta-regression analyses.

Results:
Seven cohorts including 205,349 individuals and 44,120 cases of hypertension were included. In the non-linear analysis, there was a 9% significant decreased risk of hypertension per seven cups of coffee a day, while, in the linear dose–response association, there was a 1% decreased risk of hypertension for each additional cup of coffee per day. Among subgroups, there were significant inverse associations for females, caffeinated coffee, and studies conducted in the US with longer follow-up. Analysis of potential confounders revealed that smoking-related variables weakened the strength of association between coffee consumption and risk of hypertension.

Conclusions:
Increased coffee consumption is associated with a modest decrease in risk of hypertension in prospective cohort studies. Smoking status is a potential effect modifier on the association between coffee consumption and risk of hypertension.

 

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H M Noh et al, 2017. Coffee consumption and coronary heart disease risk using the Framingham risk score. Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Volume 26 (5).

ABSTRACT:

Background and Objectives:
Although concerns regarding the influence of coffee consumption on human health have accompanied the massive increase in coffee consumption, the effects of coffee intake on the risk for coronary heart disease (CHD) remain controversial. Therefore, we evaluated the association between coffee consumption and CHD risk as estimated using the Framingham risk model in Korean adults.

Methods and Study Design:
This cross-sectional study involved 3,987 participants aged 30-74 years who participated in the fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey conducted in 2010. The frequency of coffee consumption was self-reported and classified into 4 categories (non-drinker, 1, 2, and ≥3 cups/day). The 10-year risk for CHD was determined from the Framingham risk score.

Results:
Across the levels of coffee consumption, there were significant differences in the frequency of smoking among men and advanced age, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level, diabetes, and smoking among women. In the multiple logistic regression analyses, the adjusted odds ratios (95% CI) for ≥20% 10-year CHD risk was 0.211 (0.060-0.745) for women who consumed ≥3 cups of coffee per day compared with women who consumed <1 cup per day. For women, a significant dose-response inverse association between the level of coffee consumption and 10-year CHD risk persisted even after adjusting for multiple confounding factors. For the men, however, there was no significant association between coffee consumption and 10-year CHD risk.

Conclusion:
Coffee consumption is associated with a lower risk of CHD in Korean women.

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