S O Antwi et al, 2017. Coffee consumption and risk of renal cell carcinoma, Cancer Causes and Control, published online.

ABSTRACT:

Background:
Studies have suggested an inverse association between coffee consumption and risk of renal cell carcinoma (RCC); however, data regarding decaffeinated coffee are limited.

Methods:
We conducted a case–control study of 669 incident RCC cases and 1,001 frequency-matched controls. Participants completed identical risk factor questionnaires that solicited information about usual coffee consumption habits. The study participants were categorized as noncoffee, caffeinated coffee, decaffeinated coffee, or both caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee drinkers. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using logistic regression, adjusting for multiple risk factors for RCC.

Results:
Compared with no coffee consumption, we found an inverse association between caffeinated coffee consumption and RCC risk (OR 0.74; 95% CI 0.57–0.99), whereas we observed a trend toward increased risk of RCC for consumption of decaffeinated coffee (OR 1.47; 95% CI 0.98–2.19). Decaffeinated coffee consumption was associated also with increased risk of the clear cell RCC (ccRCC) subtype, particularly the aggressive form of ccRCC (OR 1.80; 95% CI 1.01–3.22).

Conclusions:
Consumption of caffeinated coffee is associated with reduced risk of RCC, while decaffeinated coffee consumption is associated with an increase in risk of aggressive ccRCC. Further inquiry is warranted in large prospective studies and should include assessment of dose-response associations.

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E Ricci et al, 2017. Coffee and caffeine intake and male infertility: a systematic review, Nutrition Journal, Volume 16 (1)

ABSTRACT:

Background:
Semen quality, a predictor of male fertility, has been suggested declining worldwide. Among other life style factors, male coffee/caffeine consumption was hypothesized to influence semen parameters, but also sperm DNA integrity. To summarize available evidence, we performed a systematic review of observational studies on the relation between coffee/caffeine intake and parameters of male fertility including sperm ploidy, sperm DNA integrity, semen quality and time to pregnancy.

Methods:
A systematic literature search was performed up to November 2016 (MEDLINE and EMBASE). We included all observational papers that reported the relation between male coffee/caffeine intake and reproductive outcomes: 1. semen parameters, 2. sperm DNA characteristics, 3. fecundability. All pertinent reports were retrieved and the relative reference lists were systematically searched in order to identify any potential additional studies that could be included.

Results:
We retrieved 28 papers reporting observational information on coffee/caffeine intake and reproductive outcomes. Overall, they included 19,967 men. 1. Semen parameters did not seem affected by caffeine intake, at least caffeine from coffee, tea and cocoa drinks, in most studies. Conversely, other contributions suggested a negative effect of cola-containing beverages and caffeine-containing soft drinks on semen volume, count and concentration. 2. As regards sperm DNA defects, caffeine intake seemed associated with aneuploidy and DNA breaks, but not with other markers of DNA damage. 3. Finally, male coffee drinking was associated to prolonged time to pregnancy in some, but not all, studies.

Conclusions:
The literature suggests that caffeine intake, possibly through sperm DNA damage, may negatively affect male reproductive function. Evidence from epidemiological studies on semen parameters and fertility is however inconsistent and inconclusive. Well-designed studies with predefined criteria for semen analysis, subject selection, and life style habits definition, are essential to reach a consistent evidence on the effect of caffeine on semen parameters and male fertility.

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S L Carmichael et al, 2017. Maternal Smoking, Alcohol, and Caffeine Exposures and Risk of Hypospadias, Birth Defects, published online.

ABSTRACT:

Background: We examined the association of hypospadias risk with maternal smoking and consumption of alcohol and caffeine.

Methods: We analyzed data from mothers of 2437 moderate/severe cases and 5472 nonmalformed controls born from 1997 to 2011 who participated in the National Birth Defects Prevention Study (NBDPS). Exposures were assessed by maternal telephone interviews. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) adjusted for mother’s age, parity, race-ethnicity, education, vitamin/mineral supplement intake, obesity, and study center.

Results: Active smoking during the first month of pregnancy was associated with reduced risk, with smaller ORs for increasing quantity smoked; the OR for smoking >1/2 pack/day was 0.7 (95% CI, 0.5– 0.9). Among nonsmokers, the OR for any secondhand smoke exposure was 0.8 (95% CI, 0.7–0.9). ORs for alcohol and caffeine consumption were near one and CIs included 1.0. In an analysis of joint exposures to smoking and alcohol and caffeine consumption, the only OR for which the 95% CI excluded 1.0 was for women who smoked, drank, and had low caffeine consumption (OR, 0.6; 95% CI, 0.4–0.8).

Conclusion: Maternal exposure to cigarette smoke was associated with reduced risk, and women who smoked, drank, and had low caffeine intake were at lowest risk. We do not interpret these results to suggest that these exposures have overall benefit to a pregnant woman or developing fetus. They may, however, offer clues to help us understand mechanisms that lead to hypospadias.

 

The post S L Carmichael et al, 2017. Maternal Smoking, Alcohol, and Caffeine Exposures and Risk of Hypospadias, Birth Defects, published online. appeared first on Coffee and Health.