G Lippi et al, 2015, Venous thromboembolism and coffee: critical review and meta-analysis, Annals of Translational Medicine, Volume 3 (11).

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Among the various risk factors of venous thromboembolism (VTE), nutrients seem to play a significant role in the pathogenesis of this condition. This study aimed to clarify the relationship between coffee intake and venous thrombosis, and we performed a critical review of clinical studies that have been published so far.

METHODS: An electronic search was carried out in Medline, Scopus and ISI Web of Science with the keywords “coffee” AND “venous thromboembolism” OR “deep vein thrombosis” OR “pulmonary embolism” in “Title/Abstract/Keywords”, with no language and date restriction.

RESULTS: According to our criteria, three studies (two prospective and one case-control) were finally selected (inter-study heterogeneity: 78%; P<0.001). Cumulative data suggests that a modest intake of coffee (i.e., 1-4 cups/day) may be associated with an 11% increased risk of VTE compared to abstainers, whereas a larger intake (i.e., ≥5 coffee/day) may be associated with a 25% decreased risk.

CONCLUSIONS: Our analysis of published data seemingly confirm the existence of a U-shape relationship between coffee intake and VTE, thus exhibiting a trend that overlaps with that previously reported for cardiovascular disease (CVD).

The post G Lippi et al, 2015, Venous thromboembolism and coffee: critical review and meta-analysis, Annals of Translational Medicine, Volume 3 (11). appeared first on Coffee and Health.


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *