L Mo et al, 2018. Coffee consumption and risk of myocardial infarction: a dose-response meta-analysis of observational studies, Oncotarget, Volume 9(30).

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND:
Previous epidemiological studies have provided inconsistent conclusions on the effect of coffee consumption in the development of myocardial infarction (MI). The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of coffee consumption and its potential dose-response patterns on the risk of developing MI.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:
Three databases were searched for evidence of eligible studies. A random-effects model was used to pool the fully adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Dose-response analysis was performed to show the effect of each cup increased in daily coffee drinking on the risk of MI.

RESULTS:
Seventeen studies involving 233,617 participants were included in our study. The association between coffee consumption and risk of MI did not show statistical significance when pooling the outcome data for the coffee consumption categories of 1~2 vs. < 1 cup per day (OR = 1.06, 95% CI: 0.94-1.19) and 2~3 vs. < 1 cup per day (OR = 1.07, 95% CI: 0.94-1.23). Compared with < 1 cup, daily drinking of 3~4 cups and > 4 cups of coffee were significantly associated with the risk of MI, and the pooled ORs (95% CIs) were 1.40 (1.11-1.77) and 1.48 (1.22-1.79), respectively. The dose-response analysis showed a “J-shaped” curve relationship of the risk of MI with coffee consumption.

CONCLUSIONS:
Daily drinking of more than three cups of coffee was associated with a significantly increased risk of MI. This positive association was only found in men but not in women. The impact of gender on this association should be further evaluated.

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M Lukic et al, 2018. Coffee Drinking and the Risk of Endometrial Cancer: An Updated Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies, Nutrition and Cancer, published online.

ABSTRACT

Background:
Several compounds contained in coffee have been found to suppress carcinogenesis in experimental studies. We conducted a dose–response meta-analysis to assess the impact of coffee consumption on the risk of endometrial cancer.

Materials and methods:
We searched MEDLINE and EMBASE databases for studies published up to August 2016. Using random effects models, we estimated summary relative risks (RR) for cohort studies and odds ratios (OR) for case-control studies with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Dose–response analyses were conducted by using generalized least square trend estimation.

Results:
We identified 12 cohort studies and 8 case control studies eligible for inclusion, contributing with 11,663 and 2,746 endometrial cancer cases, respectively. The summary RR for highest compared with lowest coffee intake was 0.74 (95% CI: 0.68–0.81; pheterogeneity D 0.09, I 2 D 32%). The corresponding summary RR among cohort studies was 0.78 (95% CI: 0.71–0.85; pheterogeneity D 0.14, I 2 D 31.9%) and 0.63 (95% CI: 0.53–0.76; pheterogeneity D 0.57, I 2 D 0%) for case-control studies. One-cup increment per day was associated with 3% risk reduction (95% CI: 2–4%) in cohort studies and 12% (95% CI: 5–18%) in case-control studies. After pooling the results from 5 cohort studies, the association remained significant only in women with body mass index over 30 (RR D 0.71, 95% CI: 0.61–0.81).

Conclusion:
The results from our meta analysis strengthen the evidence of a protective effect of coffee consumption on the risk of EC and further suggest that increased coffee intake might be particularly beneficial for women with obesity.

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M Otake et al, 2018. Association Between Serum Folate Levels and Caffeinated Beverage Consumption in Pregnant Women in Chiba: The Japan Environment and Children’s Study, Journal of Epidemiology, published online.

ABSTRACT

Background:
Several studies have reported the adverse effects of caffeine intake during pregnancy on fetal health. However, the effects of caffeine intake from green and oolong teas has not been investigated, despite the considerable consumption of these teas in Japan and the potential inhibitory effects of catechins—chemicals present at relatively high levels in green and oolong teas—on folic acid absorption. The potential associations of serum folate levels with caffeinated beverage consumption and catechin levels remain largely unstudied. The present study aimed to determine these associations in pregnant Japanese women.

Methods:
Pregnant women (n = 2,701) not receiving folate supplementation were enrolled at the Chiba Unit Center, a regional site of the Japan Environment and Children’s Study (JECS). Serum folate levels were measured using an Access folate assay kit, and nutrient and caffeine intakes were assessed using a self-administered food frequency questionnaire that was previously evaluated in Japanese populations.

Results:
The low and normal serum folate groups reported caffeine intakes of 42.3 mg=1,000 kcal and 34.4 mg=1,000 kcal, respectively, and tannin intakes of 40.8 mg=1,000 kcal and 36.3 mg=1,000 kcal, respectively. Multiple regression analyses revealed negative associations of serum folate levels with caffeine and tannin intakes and a positive association between serum folate levels and dietary folate intake.

Conclusions:
Considering the negative associations of caffeine and tannin levels with serum folate levels, pregnant women should consume caffeinated beverages, such as coffee and green=oolong teas, with caution.

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