M Adi et al, 2018. The Role of Diet in Glaucoma: A Review of the Current Evidence, Opthal Ther, published online

ABSTRACT

Intraocular pressure (IOP) reduction by medications, laser, or surgery remains the mainstay of treatment in glaucoma. However, the role of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in glaucoma has received great interest from both patients and ophthalmologists. Previous evidence suggests that diet, a major domain of CAM, can influence an individual’s IOP level. Furthermore, certain dietary components have been linked to the incidence and progression of glaucoma. In this review, we aim to provide a summary of the current evidence regarding the role of obesity, certain dietary components, and dietary supplements in glaucoma.

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Y Zhang & D Z Zhang, 2018. Is Coffee Consumption Associated with a Lower Level of Serum C-reactive Protein? A Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies, International Journal of Food Science and Nutrition, published online.

ABSTRACT:

The association between coffee consumption and the level of C-reactive protein (CRP) has been evaluated in several epidemiological studies with conflicting results. This study aims to examine the relationship between coffee consumption and the serum CRP level. A comprehensive literature search up to August 2017, using PUBMED, EMBASE and Web of Science databases, was conducted to identify the relevant observational studies that examined the association between coffee consumption and the serum CRP level. A total of nine cross-sectional studies were included in this meta-analysis. According to the combined standard mean difference (SMD) between the highest and the lowest coffee intake category, coffee consumption was associated with a lower level of serum CRP level (SMD = -0.34, 95%CI: -0.62 to -0.06; p = .016). Subgroup analysis for CRP marker showed that coffee consumption was associated with a lower level of serum high-sensitivity CRP (hsCRP) (SMD = -0.51, 95%CI: -0.88 to -0.14; p = .007), but not standard CRP (SMD = 0.02, 95%CI: -0.28 to 0.32; p = .913). The existing evidence suggested that coffee consumption was associated with a lower level of serum CRP. More well-designed prospective cohort studies are needed to elaborate the concerned issues further.

The post Y Zhang & D Z Zhang, 2018. Is Coffee Consumption Associated with a Lower Level of Serum C-reactive Protein? A Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies, International Journal of Food Science and Nutrition, published online. appeared first on Coffee and Health.

K Yamagata et al, 2018. Do Coffee Polyphenols Have a Preventive Action on Metabolic Syndrome Associated Endothelial Dysfunctions? An Assessment of the Current Evidence, Antioxidants (Basel) Volume 7 (2).

ABSTRACT:

Epidemiologic studies from several countries have found that mortality rates associated with the metabolic syndrome are inversely associated with coffee consumption. Metabolic syndrome can lead to arteriosclerosis by endothelial dysfunction, and increases the risk for myocardial and cerebral infarction. Accordingly, it is important to understand the possible protective effects of coffee against components of the metabolic syndrome, including vascular endothelial function impairment, obesity and diabetes. Coffee contains many components, including caffeine, chlorogenic acid, diterpenes and trigonelline. Studies have found that coffee polyphenols, such as chlorogenic acids, have many health-promoting properties, such as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, anti-diabetes, and antihypertensive properties. Chlorogenic acids may exert protective effects against metabolic syndrome risk through their antioxidant properties, in particular toward vascular endothelial cells, in which nitric oxide production may be enhanced, by promoting endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression. These effects indicate that coffee components may support the maintenance of normal endothelial function and play an important role in the prevention of metabolic syndrome. However, results related to coffee consumption and the metabolic syndrome are heterogeneous among studies, and the mechanisms of its functions and corresponding molecular targets remain largely elusive. This review describes the results of studies exploring the putative effects of coffee components, especially in protecting vascular endothelial function and preventing metabolic syndrome.

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