G-M Kouli et al, 2017. J-shaped relationship between habitual coffee consumption and 10-year (2002-2012) cardiovascular disease incidence: the ATTICA study. European Journal of Nutrition, published online.

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The purpose of this work was to evaluate the association between coffee consumption and 10-year cardiovascular disease (CVD) incidence in the ATTICA study, and whether this is modified by the presence or absence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) at baseline.

METHODS: During 2001-2002, 3042 healthy adults (1514 men and 1528 women) living in the greater area of Athens were voluntarily recruited to the ATTICA study. In 2011-2012, the 10-year follow-up was performed in 2583 participants (15% of the participants were lost to follow-up). Coffee consumption was assessed by a validated food-frequency questionnaire at baseline (abstention, low, moderate, heavy). Incidence of fatal or non-fatal CVD event was recorded using WHO-ICD-10 criteria and MetS was defined by the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment panel III (revised) criteria.

RESULTS: Overall, after controlling for potential CVD risk factors, the multivariate analysis revealed a J-shaped association between daily coffee drinking and the risk for a first CVD event in a 10-year period. Particularly, the odds ratio for low (<150 ml/day), moderate (150-250 ml/day) and heavy coffee consumption (>250 ml/day), compared to abstention, were 0.44 (95% CI 0.29-0.68), 0.49 (95% CI 0.27-0.92) and 2.48 (95% CI 1.56-1.93), respectively. This inverse association was also verified among participants without MetS at baseline, but not among participants with the MetS.

CONCLUSIONS: These data support the protective effect of drinking moderate quantities of coffee (equivalent to approximately 1-2 cups daily) against CVD incidents. This protective effect was only significant for participants without MetS at baseline.

The post G-M Kouli et al, 2017. J-shaped relationship between habitual coffee consumption and 10-year (2002-2012) cardiovascular disease incidence: the ATTICA study. European Journal of Nutrition, published online. appeared first on Coffee and Health.

L Giradat-Rotar et al, 2017. Long-term effect of coffee consumption on autosomal dominant polycystic kidneys disease progression: results from the Suisse ADPKD, a Prospective Longitudinal Cohort Study, Journal of Nephrology, published online.

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND:
Previous in vitro experiments of human polycystic kidney disease (PKD) cells reported that caffeine is a risk factor for the promotion of cyst enlargement in patients with autosomal dominant PKD (ADPKD). The relentless progression of ADPKD inclines the majority of physicians to advocate minimization of caffeine consumption despite the absence of clinical data supporting such a recommendation so far. This is the first clinical study to assess prospectively the association between coffee consumption and disease progression in a longitudinal ADPKD cohort.

METHODS:
Information on coffee consumption and disease progression was collected at each follow-up visit using standardized measurement methods. The main model for the outcomes, kidney size (height-adjusted total kidney volume, htTKV) and kidney function (estimated glomerular filtration rate, eGFR), was a linear mixed model. Patients entered the on-going Swiss ADPKD study between 2006 and June 2014 and had at least 1 visit every year. The sample size of the study population was 151 with a median follow-up of 4 visits per patient and a median follow-up time of 4.38 years.

RESULTS:
After multivariate adjustment for age, smoking, hypertension, sex, body mass index and an interaction term (coffee*visit), coffee drinkers did not have a statistically significantly different kidney size compared to non-coffee drinkers (difference of -33.03 cm3height adjusted TKV, 95% confidence interval (CI) from -72.41 to 6.34, p = 0.10). After the same adjustment, there was no statistically significant difference in eGFR between coffee and non-coffee drinkers (2.03 ml/min/1.73 m2, 95% CI from -0.31 to 4.31, p = 0.089).

CONCLUSION:
Data derived from our prospective longitudinal study do not confirm that drinking coffee is a risk factor for ADPKD progression.

The post L Giradat-Rotar et al, 2017. Long-term effect of coffee consumption on autosomal dominant polycystic kidneys disease progression: results from the Suisse ADPKD, a Prospective Longitudinal Cohort Study, Journal of Nephrology, published online. appeared first on Coffee and Health.

S C Larsson et al, 2017. Coffee Consumption and Risk of Gallbladder Cancer in a Prospective Study, Journal of National Cancer Institute, Volume 109 (3).

ABSTRACT:

Evidence indicates that coffee consumption may reduce the risk of gallstone disease, which is strongly associated with increased risk of gallbladder cancer. The association between coffee consumption and gallbladder cancer incidence was examined in a prospective cohort study of 72 680 Swedish adults (aged 45 − 83 years) who were free of cancer and reported their coffee consumption at baseline. Gallbladder cancers were ascertained by linkage with the Swedish Cancer Register. The data were analyzed using Cox proportional hazards regression models. Statistical tests were two-sided. During 967 377 person-years of follow-up, 74 gallbladder cancer case patients were identified. Compared with consumption of one or less cups of coffee per day, the multivariable hazard ratios were 0.76 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.41 to 1.41) for two cups per day, 0.50 (95% CI = 0.24 to 1.06) for three cups per day, and 0.41 (95% CI = 0.20 to 0.83) for four or more cups per day. In conclusion, coffee consumption is associated with a reduced risk of gallbladder cancer.

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