K Wijarnpreecha et al, 2016. Impact of caffeine on hepatitis C virus infection: a systematic review and meta-analysis. European Journal of Gastroenterology, published online.

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is one of the most common causes of cirrhosis. Several studies have linked caffeine consumption to a lower degree of liver fibrosis and inflammation among patients with chronic HCV infection, but the results were inconsistent. This meta-analysis was carried out with the aim of assessing the impact of caffeine consumption among HCV-infected patients.

PARTICIPANTS AND METHODS: A literature search was performed using MEDLINE and EMBASE from inception to January 2016. Studies that reported relative risks, odd ratios, or hazard ratios comparing the risk of advanced liver fibrosis or the risk of moderate to severe liver inflammation among HCV-infected patients who consumed caffeine on a regular basis versus those who did not were included. Pooled odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated using a random-effect, generic inverse-variance method.

RESULTS: Five studies were included in the fibrosis analysis. The pooled OR of advanced liver fibrosis in HCV-infected patients who consumed caffeine on a regular basis versus those who did not was 0.48 (95% CI, 0.30-0.76, I=52%). Three studies were included in the inflammation analysis. The pooled OR of moderate to severe histologic inflammation among HCV-infected patients who consumed caffeine on a regular basis versus those who did not was 0.61 (95% CI, 0.35-1.04, I=43%).

CONCLUSION: Our study showed a decreased risk of advanced liver fibrosis and liver inflammation among HCV-infected patients who consumed caffeine on a regular basis. Whether consumption of caffeine plays a role in the management of HCV infection requires further investigations.

The post K Wijarnpreecha et al, 2016. Impact of caffeine on hepatitis C virus infection: a systematic review and meta-analysis. European Journal of Gastroenterology, published online. appeared first on Coffee and Health.

M Moccia et al, 2016. Caffeine Consumption and thr 4-Year Progression of de Novo Parkinson’s disease. Parkinsonism and Related Disorders, published online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT:

INTRODUCTION: Higher caffeine consumption has been associated with reduced risk of Parkinson’s disease (PD), and with a more benign progression of motor and non-motor symptoms (NMS). The present observational cohort study investigated motor and non-motor correlates of caffeine consumption in de novo PD.

METHODS: 79 newly diagnosed, drug naïve PD patients have been included and followed up for 4 years. The total caffeine use was calculated with the Caffeine Consumption Questionnaire. Following study variables were recorded at baseline, and after 2 and 4 years: UPDRS part III, UPDRS part IV, l-dopa Equivalent Daily Dose (LEDD), NMS Questionnaire (NMSQuest), and the time occurring from PD diagnosis to the need for l-dopa treatment. Age, gender and disease duration were included as covariates in the statistical models.

RESULTS: The average daily caffeine consumption was 296.1 ± 157.2 mg. At Cox regression models, higher caffeine consumption was associated with a lower rate of starting l-Dopa treatment (HR = 0.630; 95%CI = 0.382-0.996). At the mixed-effects linear regression models considering the whole study period, each additional espresso cup per day (50 mg of caffeine) was more likely associated with 5-point lower UPDRS part III total score (Coef = -0.01; 95%CI = -0.02 to 0.00), with 50% reduced LEDD (Coef = -0.01; 95%CI = -0.15 to 0.00; p = 0.021), and with 5-point lower NMSQuest total score (Coef = -0.01; 95%CI = -0.01 to 0.00), but not with UPDRS part IV total score (Coef = -0.00; 95%CI = -0.00 to 0.00).

CONCLUSION: Caffeine consumption was associated with a reduced accrual of motor and non-motor disability during 4-year follow-up in de novo PD, highlighting the rationale for using adenosine A2A antagonists since the early phases of PD.

 

The post M Moccia et al, 2016. Caffeine Consumption and thr 4-Year Progression of de Novo Parkinson’s disease. Parkinsonism and Related Disorders, published online ahead of print. appeared first on Coffee and Health.