S Narita et al, 2017. Coffee Consumption and Lung Cancer Risk: The Japan Public Health Center-Based Prospective Study, Journal of Epidemiology, published online.

ABSTRACT

Background:
Many epidemiological studies have indicated a positive association between coffee intake and lung cancer risk, but such findings were suggested to be confounded by smoking. Furthermore, only a few of these studies have been conducted in Asia. Here, we investigated the association between coffee intake and lung cancer risk in one of the largest prospective cohort studies in Japan.

Methods:
We investigated the association of coffee drinking and subsequent incidence of lung cancer among 41,727 men and 45,352 women in the Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study using Cox proportional hazards regression, with adjustment for potential confounders and by strata of smoking status. Coffee and other dietary intakes were assessed once at baseline with a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ).

Results:
During 1,481,887 person-years of follow-up between 1990 and 2011, a total of 1,668 lung cancer cases were identified. In a multivariate regression model, coffee consumption was not associated with risk of lung cancer (HR 1.16; 95% CI, 0.82–1.63; Ptrend = 0.285 for men and HR 1.49; 95% CI, 0.79–2.83; Ptrend = 0.942 for women). However, there was a significant increase in the risk for small cell carcinoma (HR 3.52; 95% CI, 1.49–8.28; Ptrend < 0.001).

Conclusion:
Our prospective study suggests that habitual consumption of coffee is not associated with an increased risk of lung cancer incidence, despite observing a significant increase in the risk for small cell carcinoma.

The post S Narita et al, 2017. Coffee Consumption and Lung Cancer Risk: The Japan Public Health Center-Based Prospective Study, Journal of Epidemiology, published online. appeared first on Coffee and Health.

H Malmir et al, 2017. Tea and coffee consumption in relation to glioma: a case-control study, European Journal of Nutrition, published online.

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE:
Data on the link between tea and coffee consumption and risk of glioma are controversial. We aimed to examine the association between tea and coffee consumption and glioma in Iranian adults.

METHODS:
In this hospital-based case-control study, we enrolled 128 pathologically confirmed new cases of glioma and 256 age- and sex-matched controls. Dietary intakes of study participants including tea and coffee consumption was assessed using the validated Block-format 123-item semi-quantitative FFQ. Participants were categorized based on tertiles of tea and coffee consumption. Data on potential confounders were also collected through the use of pre-tested questionnaire.

RESULTS:
Individuals with the greatest tea consumption were less likely to have glioma compared with those with the lowest consumption (0.36; 0.20-0.68). This inverse association was not changed after controlling for energy intake. The association remained statistically significant even after taking other potential confounders, including dietary intakes of red and processed meats, legumes and nuts, fruits, salt and mutual effects of tea and coffee consumption, into account (0.33; 0.13-0.86). Additional adjustments for BMI did not alter the association. After controlling for potential confounders, including dietary intakes and BMI, coffee consumption was inversely associated with odds of glioma; such that individuals in the top category of coffee consumption were 91% less likely to have glioma compared with those in the bottom category (0.09; 0.03-0.24). Considering coffee and tea intake combined, those in the highest tertile were 65% less likely to have glioma compared with those in the lowest tertile (0.35; 0.15-0.83).

CONCLUSION:
We found an inverse association between tea and coffee consumption and odds of glioma, even after controlling for a wide range of confounders.

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