L D’Elia et al, 2017. Coffee consumption and risk of hypertension: a dose-response meta-analysis of prospective studies, European Journal of Nutrition, published online.

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE:
Recently, a large prospective study provided additional information concerning the debated possible association between habitual coffee consumption and risk of hypertension (HPT). Therefore, we updated the state of knowledge on this issue by carrying out a comprehensive new systematic review of the literature and a meta-analysis of the available relevant studies.

METHODS:
We performed a systematic search for prospective studies on general population, published without language restrictions (1966-August 2017). A random-effects dose-response meta-analysis was conducted to combine study specific relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals. Potential non-linear relation was investigated using restricted cubic splines.

RESULTS:
Four studies (196,256 participants, 41,184 diagnosis of HPT) met the inclusion criteria. Coffee intake was assessed by dietary questionnaire. Dose-response meta-analysis showed a non-linear relationship between coffee consumption and risk of HPT (p for non-linearity < 0.001). Whereas the habitual drinking of one or two cups of coffee per day, compared with non-drinking, was not associated with risk of HPT, a significantly protective effect of coffee consumption was found starting from the consumption of three cups of coffee per day (RR = 0.97, 95% CI = 0.94 to 0.99), and was confirmed for greater consumption.

CONCLUSIONS:
The results of this analysis indicate that habitual moderate coffee intake is not associated with higher risk of HPT in the general population and that in fact a non-linear inverse dose-response relationship occurs between coffee consumption and risk of HPT.

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S Rabiepoor et al, 2017. Does coffee affect the bowel function after caesarean section? Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol, published online.

ABSTRACT:

OBJECTIVES:
Postoperative ileus is a common consequence of abdominal surgery, which tends to prolong the duration of hospital stay and imposes considerable economic costs on healthcare system. Coffee is proved to have positive effects on gastrointestinal motility index in healthy young adults. Thus, the present study aims to examine effects of coffee on bowel function after caesarean section.

MATERIAL AND METHOD:
A total number 100 patients after elective caesarean section were randomly assigned before surgery into control and intervention groups. The intervention group received 100cc coffee at 8, 12 and 20h after the surgery, while the control group received 100cc hot water at the same intervals. First bowel sound, first passage of flatus, first defecation, and length of stay after surgery were compared in the two groups.

FINDINGS:
Mean time to first flatus passage was recorded in the control (22.54±5.09h) and intervention (17.28±4.44h) groups and showed to be statistically significant (p=-0.000). However, average time of first defecation (intervention 37.22±16.31h; control 36.82±16.5h; p=0.647) and mean time of hospital stay of patients (intervention 30.08±9.50h; control 32.16±11.82h; p=0.518) and first bowel sound (intervention 5.84±1.41h; control 6.16±1.33h; p=-0.326) were not statistically significant.

DISCUSSION:
Drinking coffee after a caesarean section reduces time to first flatus in patients. Nevertheless, further studies are needed to examine effects of coffee on ileus after elective caesarean section.

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J-S Ong et al 2017. Assessment of moderate coffee consumption and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer: a Mendelian randomization study, International Journal of Epidemiology, published online.

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND:
Coffee consumption has been shown to be associated with various health outcomes in observational studies. However, evidence for its association with epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is inconsistent and it is unclear whether these associations are causal.

METHODS:
We used single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with (i) coffee and (ii) caffeine consumption to perform Mendelian randomization (MR) on EOC risk. We conducted a two-sample MR using genetic data on 44 062 individuals of European ancestry from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium (OCAC), and combined instrumental variable estimates using a Wald-type ratio estimator.

RESULTS:
For all EOC cases, the causal odds ratio (COR) for genetically predicted consumption of one additional cup of coffee per day was 0.92 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.79, 1.06]. The COR was 0.90 (95% CI: 0.73, 1.10) for high-grade serous EOC. The COR for genetically predicted consumption of an additional 80 mg caffeine was 1.01 (95% CI: 0.92, 1.11) for all EOC cases and 0.90 (95% CI: 0.73, 1.10) for high-grade serous cases.

CONCLUSIONS:
We found no evidence indicative of a strong association between EOC risk and genetically predicted coffee or caffeine levels. However, our estimates were not statistically inconsistent with earlier observational studies and we were unable to rule out small protective associations

The post J-S Ong et al 2017. Assessment of moderate coffee consumption and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer: a Mendelian randomization study, International Journal of Epidemiology, published online. appeared first on Coffee and Health.