Y Xie et al, 2016. Coffee consumption and risk of gastric cancer: an updated meta-analysis. Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Volume 25 (3).

ABSTRACT:

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES:
Coffee is one of the most widely consumed beverages worldwide, and many studies have investigated the association between coffee consumption and gastric cancer. However, the results are inconsistent. We conducted a systematic analysis of relevant population studies to derive a more precise estimation.

METHODS AND STUDY DESIGN:
Cochrane library, PubMed and Embase databases were searched to identify studies that met predetermined inclusion criterion through July 2014. All epidemiologic studies regarding coffee consumption and gastric cancer risk were selected, and relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated.

RESULTS:
Twenty two studies (9 cohort and 13 case-control studies) involving 7,631 cases and 1,019,693 controls were included. The summary RR of gastric cancer was 0.94 (95% CI: 0.80-1.10) for the highest category of coffee consumption compared with the lowest category, and 0.93 (95% CI: 0.88-0.99) for coffee drinkers compared with nondrinkers. We stratified the population by coffee consumption. The pooled RR for the population with <1 cup/day, 1-2 cups/day and 3-4 cups/day coffee consumption compared with nondrinkers were 0.95 (95% CI: 0.84-1.08), 0.92 (95% CI: 0.82-1.03) and 0.88 (95% CI: 0.76-1.02), respectively, indicating that an increase in coffee consumption was associated with a decreased risk of gastric cancer. Furthermore, we stratified the studies by design, sex, population and time. A significant association betweencoffee intake and decreased gastric cancer risk was shown in case-control studies (RR=0.85, 95% CI: 0.77-0.95) and among the studies published over the last ten years (RR=0.88, 95% CI: 0.77-1.00).

CONCLUSIONS:
Our meta-analysis suggested that coffee consumption might be associated with a decreased risk of gastric cancer.

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G Grosso et al, 2016. Coffee consumption and mortality in three Eastern European countries: results from the HAPIEE (Health, Alcohol and Psychological factors in Eastern Europe) study. Public Health Nutrition, published online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT:

OBJECTIVE: To test the association between coffee consumption and risk of all-cause, CVD and cancer death in a European cohort.

DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. Cox proportional hazards models with adjustment for potential confounders to estimate multivariable hazard ratios (HR) and 95 % CI were used.

SETTING: Czech Republic, Russia and Poland.

SUBJECTS: A total of 28561 individuals followed for 6·1 years.

RESULTS: A total of 2121 deaths (43·1 % CVD and 35·7 % cancer mortality) occurred during the follow-up. Consumption of 3-4 cups coffee/d was associated with lower mortality risk in men (HR=0·83; 95 % CI 0·71, 0·99) and women (HR=0·63; 95 % CI 0·47, 0·84), while further intake showed non-significant reduced risk estimates (HR=0·71; 95 % CI 0·49, 1·04 and HR=0·51; 95 % CI 0·24, 1·10 in men and women, respectively). Decreased risk of CVD mortality was also found in men (HR=0·71; 95 % CI 0·54, 0·93) for consumption of 3-4 cups coffee/d. Stratified analysis revealed that consumption of a similar amount of coffee was associated with decreased risk of all-cause (HR=0·61; 95 % CI 0·43, 0·87) and cancer mortality (HR=0·59; 95 % CI 0·35, 0·99) in non-smoking women and decreased risk of all-cause mortality for >4 cups coffee/d in men with no/moderate alcohol intake.

CONCLUSIONS: Coffee consumption was associated with decreased risk of mortality. The protective effect was even stronger when stratification by smoking status and alcohol intake was performed.

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Y Zhang et al, 2016. Is coffee consumption associated with a lower risk of hyperuricaemia or gout? A systematic review and meta-analysis. BMJ Open, published online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT:

OBJECTIVES: To examine the associations of coffee consumption with the serum uric acid (SUA) level, hyperuricaemia (HU) and gout.

DESIGN: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

DATA SOURCES AND STUDY ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA: A comprehensive literature search up to April 2015, using PubMed and EMBASE databases, was conducted to identify the observational researches that examined the associations of coffee consumption with the SUA level, HU and gout. The standard mean difference (SMD), OR, relative risk (RR) and their corresponding 95% CIs for the highest and the lowest categories of coffee intake were determined.

RESULTS: A total of 11 observational studies (6 cross-sectional, 3 cohort and 2 case-control studies) were included in this systematic review and meta-analysis. The combined SMD suggested that there was no significant difference between the highest and the lowest coffee intake categories in terms of the SUA level (SMD=-0.09, 95% CI -0.23 to 0.05; p=0.21). Meanwhile, the overall multivariable adjusted OR for HU showed no significant difference between the highest and the lowest coffee intake categories (OR=0.84, 95% CI 0.65 to 1.09; p=0.20). However, the overall multivariable adjusted RR for gout showed a significant inverse association between coffee consumption and the incidence of gout (RR=0.43, 95% CI 0.31 to 0.59, p<0.001).

CONCLUSIONS: Current evidences are insufficient to validate the association between coffee consumption and a lower risk of HU. Owing to the limited number of studies, the available data show that coffee consumption may be associated with a lower risk of incident gout. Further well-designed prospective researches and randomised controlled trials are therefore needed to elaborate on these issues.

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